Partnering to reduce environmental impact

−M&CC, CARDI, collaborate to end coconut shell waste

event marks launch of CARDI’s 45th Anniversary

DPI, Guyana, Friday, December 6, 2019

Some 175 tons of coconut shells are produced across Georgetown weekly and addressing its disposal is part of a new city initiative.

That figure was provided by the Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) which will soon collaborate with the Mayor and City Council (M&CC) to address the issue.

Councillors and residents were Friday treated to a demonstration on the use of a shredding machine and how coconut shells could be properly disposed.

Mayor of Georgetown, His Worship Pandit Ubraj Narine, told DPI that discarded coconut shells were among the many waste items that cost the council millions of dollars to clean.

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Pandit Ubraj Narine, Mayor of Georgetown.

“I was approached by the agency CARDI, and I was impressed by the idea, so I asked that we hold this demonstration for residents to see for themselves what we can do to minimise littering in this aspect,” the mayor said.

Officer in Charge of CARDI, Jhaman Kundun, explained that the demonstration highlighted the institute’s work under the EU/ACP-funded Regional Coconut Industry Development Project.

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Jhaman Kundun, Officer in Charge of CARDI

He believes the coconut shells could be used to create value-added products and jobs to alleviate disposal and environmental issues.

“Coconut fibre (coir) and dust derived from shredded coconut have tremendous benefits to the agriculture and manufacturing sectors; it serves as an amazing growing medium for hydroponics and indoor uses.

There is great potential for domestic usage and huge export markets exist,” Kundun added.

Mayor Narine said city officials will meet with the CARDI representative to determine the way forward on the initiative.

Friday’s event also marked the launch of CARDI’s 45th anniversary celebrations.

 

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